CD "The Cleggan Bay Disaster"

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Original Sleeve Notes:

Tracks:

  1. Eastbound Train
  2. Castle Kelly / Sligo Creek (Reels)
  3. Hill of Plenty
  4. Return from Fingal / Heaton Chapel (Marches)
  5. Row Home
  6. The Cleggan Bay Disaster
  7. Trip to Brittany / Sliabh Russel / Scarce o' Tatties / Lost and Found (Jigs)
  8. Sally Brown
  9. Cahir's Kitchen / Moondance
  10. Ace and Deuce of Pipering (Setdance)
  11. The Ballad of John B. Whistlin'
  12. Tongadale / New Rigged Ship (Reels)
  13. The Curragh Song (Shadowers)

Recorded and produced by Andy Horn & Fleadh
at the Red Room, Berolzheim
www.andyhorn.de

© 2013 Fleadh

Greenhill Media, LC 13476
Order No.: ghm-10113

All tracks and sets arranged by Fleadh.
Hill of Plenty, The Cleggan Bay Disaster, Row Home, The Curragh
Song & The Ballad of John B. Whistlin' (Saoirse Mhór)
Moondance (Van Morrison), Eastbound Train (Luka Bloom)

All instrumental tunes traditional, except:
Scares o'Tatties (Norman MacLean), Cahir's Kitchen (Paddy Keenan),
Heaton Chapel (Kevin Crawford), Trip to Brittany (Michael McGoldrick),
Sligo Creek (Danny Noveck), Tongadale Reel (Farquhar MacDonald)

Paintings by Karin Weber.

Thanks to all who helped and inspired us in the making of CBD:
Andy Horn, Uli Schmidt, Karin Weber, Anne Seeger, Birgit Durney,
Ramona Hoffmann, Miriam Burkardt, Michael Busch, Pat Kelly, Walter Lelle,
Andreas Rogge, Bernd Klippert, Heather, Mary, P.J. and
Oliver's Seafood Bar Cleggan. Thanks for the guitars, Peter.
Lukas Krakora for his Bohemian Typewriter font.

We are Fleadh:

  • Saoirse Mhór (vocals, guitar, percussion, songwriting)
  • Tommy Gorny (guitar, bass, backing vocals)
  • Marcus Eichenlaub (fiddle)
  • Frank Dürschner (banjo, mandolin, harmonica, backing vocals)
  • Frank Weber (uilleann pipes, low whistle, bodhrán)

Guest Musicians:

  • Uli Schmidt (banjo)
  • Isabel Eichenlaub (cello)


Additional Notes (Lyrics / Sheets)

2. Castle Kelly / Sligo Creek (Reels)

1.1 Eastbound Train

Luka Bloom

Sorry, lyrics not available due to copyright reasons.

1.2 The Wind that shakes the Barley

traditional



2.1 Castle Kelly

traditional

2.2 Sligo Creek

Danny Noveck

Sorry, sheet not available due to copyright reasons.




3. The Hill of Plenty

Saoirse Mhór

Well I built my house of stone and of strong wood
And I built it sturdy, I built it sturdy,
I have a horse of almost 18 hands
Made for working, made for working,

My children they are tall and they stand proud
Just like their father, just like their mother
And my wife she keeps me warm deep in the night
That's when we slumber, that's when we slumber

But the moneymen are running 'round the country
Pushing money into our hands
Make us feel like we have risen to the gentry
And that you can reach the Hill of Plenty

I have seen some men work hard down on their knees
It makes them stronger, it makes them stronger
When they close their eyes at night they find their peace
They might live longer, they might live longer

I have seen some rich men begging in the streets
They once flew higher, they once flew higher
In the queue they look the same as you and me
And that's not surprising, and that's not surprising

But the moneymen are running 'round the country
Pushing money into our hands
Make us feel like we have risen to the gentry
And that you can reach the Hill of Plenty

Ah the moneymen they leaving our poor country
with our money in their hands
Now you know that we will never be the gentry
And that we won't reach the Hill of Plenty




4.1 Return from Fingal

traditional

4.2 Heaton Chapel (March)

Kevin Crawford

Sorry, sheet not available due to copyright reasons.




5. Row Home

Saoirse Mhór

Ah the sea is so great and my boat is so small
tonight it is cold as the waves rise and fall
My children are hungry they sit by the hearth
their mother is anxiously waiting

Of a man is expected to fulfill his deeds
to flourish in business and to sow all his seeds
but the demons that travel beside me tonight
they pull at my strength and my sense's

Row home.

Ah my hands all a trembling I'm cold from my sweat
My boats all a bobbin' as I pull in my net
and counting my fish on my knees in the dark
I'm glad theres enough for returning

Ah the sea is so great and my boat is so small
tonight it is cold as the waves rise and fall
My children are hungry they sit by the hearth
their mother is anxiously waiting

Row Home




6. The Cleggan Bay Disaster

Saoirse Mhór

On a wet October Day in `27
It would be a day we never would forget
In a tiny fishing port in the west of Ireland
Where a fishermen decides to use their net's

They sailed the seas to feed their hungry children
While their women waited back upon the shore
They stamped their oars in the rough Atlantic Ocean

Four and forty men were lost
But the memory remains
Of The Cleggan Bay disaster
Rossadilisk
Inishbofin

The Doctor heard the warning on the airwaves
And he sent to warn the fishers of their fate
A farmhand took a horse and rode from Cleggan
It was later said he arrived an hour too late

At first the sea was lying like a mirror
But then the dusk was coming down upon them fast
When the nets were out the ocean started rolling
They could not see each other in the dark

Sheady Feeny later said that he heard men screaming
As desperately they tried to hold their nets
Essential for the upkeep of their families
Most of them were hence pulled to their deaths




7.1 Trip to Brittany

Michael McGoldrick

Sorry, sheet not available due to copyright reasons.

7.2 Sliabh Russel

traditional

7.3 Scarce o' Tatties

Norman MacLean

Sorry, sheet not available due to copyright reasons.

7.4 Lost and Found

traditional



8. Sally Brown

traditional

I Shipped on board off a Liverpool liner
Way hey roll and go
And we rolled all night
And we rolled all day
For to spend our money along with Sally Brown.

Sally Brown is a nice young lady
Way hay roll and go
And we rolled all night
And we rolled all day
For to spend my money along with Sally Brown.

She's tall and she's dark and she's not too shady
Way hay roll and go
And we rolled all night
And we rolled all day
For to spend my money along with Sally Brown.

Her mother doesn't like no tarry sailor
Way hay roll and go
And we rolled all night
And we rolled all day
For to spend my money along with Sally Brown.

She once had to marry a one legged captain
Way hay roll and go
And we rolled all night
And we rolled all day
For to spend our money along with Sally Brown.

Sally wouldn't marry me so I shipped across the water
Way hay roll and go
And we rolled all night
And we rolled all day
For to spend our money along with Sally Brown.

And now I am courting Sally's daughter
Way hay roll and go
And we rolled all night
And we rolled all day
For to spend our money along with Sally Brown.

I shipped off board a Liverpool liner
Way hey roll and go
And we rolled all night
And we rolled all day
For to spend our money along with Sally Brown.




9.1 Cahir's Kitchen

Paddy Keenan

Sorry, sheet not available due to copyright reasons.

9.2 Moondance

Van Morrison

Sorry, lyrics not available due to copyright reasons.

9.3 Eddie Kelly#s Jig #2

traditional



10. Ace and Deuce of Pipering (Setdance)

traditional



11. The Ballad of John B. Whistlin'

Saoirse Mhór

Oh my name is John B. Whistlin' and I'm free to state my mind
I tell you that I've seen the world but that's easy when you're blind
And I'll listen to a preacher if he answers to the name of
John B. Whistlin'
Well I have not suffered hunger since way back in '49
But my silver spoon and my knife and fork are losing all their shine
And my pockets are all empty I'm the working man named,
John B.Whistlin'

You can talk to me but I can't hear what you say
You might be light footed but I'm not going your way

I have danced with kings and queens in castles airy and endowed
And I rose my voice in mobs and gangs and the revolution crowd
But I'll never be a turncoat I'll stay loyal to the man called
John B. Whistlin'
The women they will love you when you've money in your hand
But their morning beds are cold when I go tripping 'ore the land
But I'll leave a one and sixpencepretty penny for the memory of
John B. Whistlin'

I'll have whiskey for my breakfast and for supper I'll have beer
My tobacco's always borrowed and I poker with a sneer
And I'll wrestle with the strongest man who stands in front of
John B Whistlin'
My Mother always said John you'll be going straight to hell
Well I'm not afraid of Lucifer and I've stories I could tell
I'm depending on St. Peter and his knowledge of
John B. Whistlin'




12.1 Tongadale Reel

Farquhar MacDonald

Sorry, sheet not available due to copyright reasons.

12.2 The New Rigged Ship (Reel)

traditional



13. The Curragh Song (Shadowers)

Saoirse Mhór

When I look back now at my finest hour
when I was young and mad when I still had the power
when we lived and played in the shadow of the Tower
in the Curragh

There were Burkes and Brownes O'Reillys and O'Sheas
Shanahans and Houlihans, O'Sullivans and Sheridans
Sweenys Murphys Farrells and Moores
in the Curragh

We all done our best at the National School
You sat up straight and try to learn the rules
the chalk and the dusters and the pencils flew
In the Curragh

My family lived in the hospital grounds
and early in the morning you could hear the sound
of the rangers going by and their boots would pound
We are Rangers

In Mc Donagh or Pearse, Connolly or Ceannt
Plunkett or Clarke or anywhere you went
there were soldiers, nurses, priests and curses
in the Curragh

There was Dobbinses and Macinteers, Easons & Maginns
Powells, the Wes or the Church for your sins
and Reggie done the hair that everyone would wear
in the Curragh

My family lived in the hospital grounds
and early in the morning you could sometimes hear the sound
of the rangers going by and their boots would pound
We are Rangers

The kids ran around with their hoops and their sticks
the bell rang loud for the Angelus at six
and the soldiers kissed the girls in the dark at the Flics
in the Curragh

There were privates, sergeants officers, cadets
Unimogs and tanks we hadn't any jets
BQ's, CQ's and GQ's
in the Curragh

My family lived in the hospital grounds
and early in the morning you could sometimes hear the sound
of the rangers going by and their boots would pound?..
We are Rangers

Oh the concrete walls of the handball alleys
Soldiers all sweatin? clocking up a tally
And the kids all watching waiting for the bottles
In the Curragh

We'd run off to Sandes with the bottles in our hands
where we'd haul in our prize with a glint in our eyes
Bullseyes in bags or a couple of fags
in the Curragh

My family lived in the hospital grounds
and early in the morning you could sometimes hear the sound
of the rangers going by and their boots would pound?..
We are Rangers



Reviews

07/2013:

Fleadh "The Cleggan Bay Disaster"

A fine German Irish band, featuring German instrumentalists and Irish ex-pat Saoirse Mhór. About half of the album's title are songs, the other half tunes. The tunes sound fresh and have a good full sound, with guitars, fiddle, banjo/mandolin, uillean pipes/low whistle etc. Most of the songs are written by Saoirse Mhór, contemporary songs with an Irish trad flair about them - highlight being the title track of the album, somewhat reminiscent of Christy Moore material, with a great tune and good lyrics telling the tragic story of 44 fishermen lost to the sea. The other songs don't quite live up to that standard but are still solid. Plenty to enjoy on this album.

Reviewer: Michael Moll
Original Link: http://www.folkworld.eu/51/e/cds2.html#flea, am 19.8.2013



im Juli 2013:

FLEADH - The Cleggan Bay Disaster (2013)

Malgré un nom faisant directement référence à la tradition celtique qu'il semble adorer (il signifie « festival » en langue gaélique), FLEADH est en passe de devenir une institution de la scène folk celtique germanique. Encore un groupe allemand, eh oui, car c'est désormais dans ce pays, tout autant qu'en Écosse et qu'en Irlande, que l'on trouve le plus important vivier de musiciens souhaitant dédier leur carrière au développement de la musique celtique. Il aura fallu néanmoins 11 ans à FLEADH pour concrétiser ses projets puisque, créé en 1999, le groupe ne donnera naissance qu'en 2010 à son premier album, Humpy and Lumpy, après qu'il eut recruté le chanteur irlandais Saoirse Mhor. Une arrivée importante, puisqu'elle permet à FLEADH de ne pas se « contenter » d'interpréter à sa sauce des traditionnels issus du répertoire celte, mais de proposer également ses propres compositions, qui s'avèrent fort convaincantes !

On reste en effet béat à l'écoute des cinq morceaux créés de toutes pièces par le groupe. Il y a sur « Hill of plenty » et « Row home » cette mélancolie latente, à la fois triste et révoltée, que l'on retrouve à l'écoute d'artistes tels que Dougie MacLean ou Christy Moore. La guitare acoustique, couplée avec le chant solennel et habité de Saorise Mhor, offre à ces deux morceaux une beauté pure et délicate. Le titre « The Cleggan Bay Disaster », qui donne son nom à l'album, est une autre pépite. Traitant de la catastrophe de Cleggan Bay, une tempête violente qui battit les côtes du Connemara en 1927 et prit la vie de très nombreux marins-pêcheurs, ce titre ce voit porté par une guitare acoustique énergique et un violon mêlant dextérité et solennité. Évoquant un groupe tel que The Elders, voici un morceau digne des plus grands du folk celtique, catégorie à laquelle FLEADH ne semble pas bien loin d'appartenir. Un peu plus passe-partout, « The ballad of John B. Whistlin' » se voit supplantée par la dernière composition originale, « The Curragh song », titre de country en version celtique qui peut aisément espérer devenir lui-même un traditionnel dans les années à venir, et si les deux païens offrent suffisamment de succès à FLEADH.

On en vient ainsi à regretter que l'album ne soit pas composé uniquement de titres originaux. Allez, ne soyons pas bégueule, et reconnaissons que le groupe a effectué un choix pertinent de reprises. Dans la musique celtique contemporaine, on apprécie le choix en titre d'ouverture de « Eastbound train », titre originellement écrit par Luka Bloom, frère de Christy Moore et lui-aussi tributaire d'une carrière fort honorable. Comme quoi... L'autre reprise, « Moondance » de Van Morrisson, prévaut grâce à son côté jazzy qui apporte une belle variété à l'ensemble. Reste donc une moitié d'album composée de traditionnels, qui mettent en avant les compétences musicales des six membres du groupe. Flûte, violon, mandoline ou bodhran s'en donnent à cœur joie et excellent dans l'interprétation de thèmes qui, à l'exception de quelques uns, ne sont pas parmi les plus connus du répertoire celtique, et permettent donc à FLEADH de ne pas donner l'impression de jouer la facilité. La délicte « Return from Fingal » et sa flûte doucereuse, « Ace and deuce of pipering », dont la cornemuse sautillante soutient parfaitement ce morceau que l'on verrait bien interprété à l'occasion d'un ceilidh, ou encore les reels « Tongadale / New Rigged Ship » se font, malgré leur âge, porteurs d'une fraîcheur et bénéficient d'un véritable savoir-faire de la part des musiciens de FLEADH.

Voici donc un deuxième album auto-produit, distribué avec les moyens du bord, et qui pourtant de révèle le témoignage d'une véritable force vive dans le domaine du folk celtique germanique. N'hésitez pas à vous renseigner sur ce groupe très prometteur composé de musiciens accomplis.

Übersetzung aus dem Französischen von Céline Lecesne und Karl Schramm:

Wenn auch der Name Fleadh (gälisch für Fest) direkt auf die keltische Tradition hinweist, der sich die Gruppe verpflichtet fühlt, wird sie möglicherweise bald eine Institution der deutschen Celtic Folk Szene werden. Eine deutsche Band, die ihre Karriere der keltischen Musik widmet, in diesem Land schon so selbstverständlich wie in Schottland oder Irland, wo wir eigentlich einen größeren Musikerpool finden. Elf Jahre waren bei Fleadh nötig, ihr Projekt zu realisieren, denn obwohl schon 1999 gegründet, entstand das erste Album "Humpy’n’Lumpy" erst im Jahr 2010, nachdem sich der irische Sänger Saoirse Mhór der Gruppe angeschlossen hatte. Eine entscheidende Verbindung, erlaubt sie Fleadh doch, nicht nur traditionelles keltisches Musikmaterial zu interpretieren, sondern auch eigene Kompositionen vorzustellen, die sich als überaus überzeugend erweisen.

Sprachlosigkeit stellt sich ein, wenn man die fünf selbst komponierten und arrangierten Stücke der Gruppe (auf "The Cleggan Bay Disaster") hört. Bei "Hill of Plenty" und "Row Home" finden wir diese subtile Melancholie, traurig und zugleich aufwühlend, die sich auch einstellt, wenn man Künstlern wie Dougie McLean oder Christy Moore zuhört. Die akustische Gitarre in Kombination mit dem intensiven und beseelten Gesang Saoirse Mhórs verleiht diesen beiden Songs eine reine und zarte Schönheit. Der Titelsong des Albums "The Cleggan Bay Disaster" ist ein weiteres Kleinod. Er erzählt die Katastrophe von Cleggan Bay, die Geschichte eines heftigen Sturms, der die Küste von Connemara im Jahr 1927 heimgesucht und das Leben vieler Fischer gefordert hatte. Getragen wird das Lied von einer akustischen, energiegeladenen Gitarre und einer Violine, die eine Mischung aus Virtuosität und Intensität verkörpert. Es erinnert an die Band "The Elders", eine der großen Celtic Music Bands, zu deren Kreis Fleadh wohl auch bald gehören wird. "The Ballad of John B. Whistlin’", ein Stück für alle Gelegenheiten, wird von der letzten Eigenkomposition "The Curragh Song” noch übertroffen, einer Art keltischem Countrysong, der durchaus das Zeug zum Klassiker hat.

Fast bedauert man, daß das Album nicht ausschließlich aus eigenem Material besteht. Man muß allerdings einräumen, daß die Gruppe eine perfekte Auswahl von Coversongs getroffen hat. Ein Klassiker der heutigen Celtic Music ist das Eröffnungsstück "Eastbound Train", ein Titel von Luka Bloom, dem jüngeren Bruder von Christy Moore, der selbst auf eine erfolgreiche Musikerkarriere zurückblicken kann. Das zweite Stück, "Moondance" von Van Morrison gewinnt durch das jazzig angehauchte Arrangement, das die Vielfältigkeit des Ensembles demonstriert. Bleibt noch die andere Hälfte des Albums, die aus traditionellen Titeln besteht, die noch einmal die musikalische Kompetenz der sechs Gruppenmitglieder unterstreichen. Diese Stücke gehören nicht unbedingt zum Standardrepertoire und zeigen Fleadhs Mut zum Risiko, sie werden mit Flöte, Violine, Mandoline, Bodhrán hervorragend interpretiert. Beim musikalischen Leckerbissen "Return to Fingal" brilliert die Flöte, "Ace And Deuce of Pipering" wird beherrscht von der hüpfenden Dudelsackmelodie, von der Band perfekt begleitet und könnte bei jedem Ceilidh punkten. Auch "Tongadale" und "The New Rigged Ship" klingen trotz ihres Alters frisch und gekonnt gespielt von den Fleadh-Musikern.

"The Cleggan Bay Disaster" ist das zweite, selbstproduzierte und selbst vertriebene Album der Gruppe Fleadh., das von der lebendigen Kraft von Celtic Folk Made in Germany zeugt. Es lohnt sich, mehr über diese äußerst vielversprechende Gruppe mit ihren hervorragenden Musikern zu erfahren.



im Juli 2013:

Fleadh - The Cleggan Bay Disaster (Greenhill Media)

The name is deceptive, for although its music is definitely Irish, indeed pan-Celtic in flavour, it’s actually a German band; in fact it’s that country’s top folk-rock outfit and have been in business since 1999, with its present lineup dating back to 2007. Theirs is a fresh-faced, accomplished sound, owing more to folk than rock, with a keenly balanced mix of timbres (guitar, bass, fiddle, banjo/mandolin and uilleann pipes/whistle) that mixes styles and rhythms in the modern rather than strictly traditional style I’d say, incorporating touches of jazzy syncopation as unassumingly as driving dance rhythms.

The instrumental abilities of the members of this ebullient quintet can’t be called into question, and neither can their respect for Irish tradition, although their interpretation of that word can be heard to embrace contemporaries like Waterboys, Christy Moore and Van Morrison - the latter’s Moondance crops up cheekily appended to a slightly ska-toned take on Paddy Keenan’s tune Cahir’s Kitchen, while Luka Bloom’s Eastbound Train heads up the album’s tracklist. The album’s principal interest for many, though, will probably be the five songs penned by the band’s singer, Saoirse Mhór, whose fine, very Irish vocals (with their frequent distinct shadings of Christy Moore) impart a signature feature to the band’s music. In particular, the title track’s unsentimental but clearly felt account of an archetypal tragedy and the preceding fisherman’s ballad Row Home make for a powerful sequence, but although the more puckish pub-folk liveliness of The Ballad Of John B. Whistlin’ and The Curragh Song don’t ring anything like as true musically you can’t deny that Saoirse has a flair for composition.

The instrumental tracks are suitably lively and will give much pleasure. The best of these is surely the deftly dynamic seven-minute set of jigs strategically placed at the centre of the running order, but there’s also much to enjoy in the Tongadale/New Rigged Ship pairing and the classic set dance The Ace And Deuce Of Pipering (take a bow here, Fleadh’s master piper and founder member Frank Weber). The disc also includes a distinct (though exceedingly likeable) curiosity, a cowpoke-country-inflected rendition of the shanty Sally Brown that probably takes the "roll and go" refrain a little too literally!

In spite of the disc’s title, this is quite a feelgood record and Fleadh would, on this showing, appear to deserve their high reputation as one of the best of the what might be classed non-indigenous bands purveying this kind of music. Available from www.copperplatemailorder.com

David Kidman July 2013, Original Link:
http://www.netrhythms.co.uk/reviews.html#fleadh



, July 2013:

Fleadh is described as the Germany's top folk-rock band but l'd drop the rock bit.

They play with a deft touch and there's no plodding bass or pounding drums although there is plenty of crossover and dynamic music. The quintet mixes songs by Saoirse Mhor, traditional and written tunes and covers from two of the world's greatest living lrishmen, Luka Bloom and Van Morrison.

This is a very Irish album although it includes the only country and western shanty I've ever heard in a quite extraordinary rendition of 'Sally Brown'. Knowing the Germans' reputation for their love of side-splitting humour it's probably supposed to be funny although the transatlantic style is echoed in 'The Ballad Of John B. Whistlin" so I'm not sure.

Elsewhere we have classics like 'Ace and Deuce of Pipering' - Frank Weber is the band's piper - and 'New Rigged Ship' and, in the title track, the sort of disaster that is found all over the Celtic world.

l'd bet that Fleadh are a blast live and this is an album I'd play when l didn't want to take life too seriously. Dai Jeffries



, May 2013:

" ...
Now, a largely German folk band called Fleadh have just released an excellent album, The Cleggan Bay Disaster.
...
The record is deservedly picking up some airplay on folk programms in Britain and look out for them, hopefully, on festival bills here over the summer months.
... "



vom 12.04.2013:

Album Review - Fleadh / The Clegan Bay Disaster

Posted by Tony Lawless on April 12, 2013 at 8:30

Fleadh was formed in 1999 by the German Uilleann Pipe player Frank Weber and like a lot of bands went through a period of development. Frank Dürschner (banjo, mando, harp ) and Tommy Gorny (guitar) have been with the band from the start with the addition of Irish singer songwriter Saoirse Mhór and fiddler Marcus Eichenlaub. They first studio album Humpy n’ Lumpy released in 2010 received the award of Best German Folk Band from the German Musicians Union DRMV. The new formation opened up possibilities for Mhór and his songwriting. The band returned from from holiday in Connemara inspired by the story of the 1927 Storm disaster that struck Connemara and Saoirse quickly set to work to come up with the title track for the album.

The album comprises Irish traditional tunes mixed in with some more folk/rock and blues inspired numbers. They opener is a Luka Bloom composition called Eastbound Train. Luca and his brother Christy Moore provide inspiration to a number of the tracks especially the new compositions. As a group, Fleadh have definitely moved in the right direction from their previous album Humpy 'N' Lumpy which was mostly covers. Saoirse Mhór provides the new material which includes Hill of Plenty, The Cleggan Bay Disaster, Row Home and The Curragh Song. The stand out track is Row Home where Saoirse keeps the lyrics sparse and clear with a simple but effective refrain. You could expect this song to be covered by other artists. Some of the other songs lack this lyrical clarity but still show a strong trend in the right direction of mixing self compositions into the set. The Ballad of John B. Whistlin' is another strong blues inspired track that closes out the album.



Alex Monaghan ( ), April 2013:

FLEADH - The Cleggan Bay Disaster

Greenhill Media GHM 10113 www.fleadh.de 13 tracks, 60 minutes

A brave title from arguably Germany's top Irish folk-rock-pub band, Fleadh's third album cements a line-up which has had considerable success since 2007. Eight vocal tracks and five instrumentals: Fleadh's Irish credentials are mainly the singing of Saoirse Mhór and guitar accompaniment of Tommy Gorny. Saoirse wrote five of the songs here, including the title track: the others come from the pens of Luka Bloom and Van Morrison, plus the traditional Sally Brown in a version which is surprisingly distant from the classic Planxty cut. Saoirse is backed and tagged by piper Frank Weber, banjoman Frank Dürschner, and fiddler Marcus Eichenlaub. This quintet won the 2010 German Rock and Pop Award for folk: you might see them on Eurovision yet. In fairness, they couldn't do much worse than Dervish.

Kicking off with Bloom's Eastbound Train wedded to the traditional favourite Wind that Shakes the Barley, Fleadh provide an hour of Irish-themed folk rock which keeps the toes tapping and the pints sinking. Western style guitar underpins reels and jigs, Castle Kelly firmly bowed by Eichenlaub and Sliabh Russell on Weber's powerful pipes. The piping is a key feature, with a very respectable solo on The Ace and Deuce, although Weber switches to whistle for the Seamus Ennis air Return from Fingal. The instrumental side is boosted by some Scottish imports - Shetland reel The New Rigged Ship, Silly Wizard jig The Scarce o' Tatties, and Farquhar MacDonald's great tune The Tongadale Reel - but the vocals are what really set Fleadh apart. Having a true Irish singer is a big plus, and Saoirse can handle anything from the mid-Atlantic drawl of Moondance to the pure traditional tones of his own Cleggan Bay Disaster. Despite the divergence over Sally Brown, there's more than a touch of Christy Moore's style about this ballad, more than a passsing resemblance between The Curragh Song and Christy's Lisdoonvarna, and a familiar Moore socialist sentiment in The Hill of Plenty.

Great lyrics, good tunes, a range of styles from Dylan to Dubliners, and a fine lead singer: Fleadh have all that and more, over there in the Rheinland. Fortunately their music is available on the web, but the live experience may involve a cheap flight and a lot of German beer. Take your pick: either way, it won't be a disaster.

Alex Monaghan



vom 10.04.2013:

The Cleggan Bay Disaster’ from Fleadh - archetypal Irish folk

(April 10, 2013)

Working with the endearing Irish folk tradition, blending original arrangements and compositions, Fleadh are in many ways an archetypal Irish folk band. Their latest album ‘The Cleggan Bay Disaster’ shows their abiding respect for and skill with Irish folk but also demonstrates their eagerness to The Cleggan Bay Disastermove within the tradition to create their own particular sound. The fact they abide in Germany has little to do with it. The essence of Irish culture and tradition has a habit of appearing all over the world with the wanderings of its people - the search for a future, the Flight of the Wild Geese, escaping famine and the clutches of absentee landlords - Irish culture, mythology, stories and music have travelled far and wide.

On this album, ‘The Cleggan Bay Disaster’ the band show off their considerable ability combining songs and instrumentals to deliver a fine collection. There’s a sequence of reels ‘Castle Kelly / Sligo Creek’, a set of majestic marches ‘Return from Fingal / Heaton Chapel’ a blistering quartet of jigs with ‘Trip to Brittany / Sliabh Russel / Scarce o' Tatties / Lost and Found’ and a superb set dance ‘Ace and Deuce of Pipering’. Their touch with songs is augmented by Saoirse Mhór’s Irish lilt and include the eponymous ‘The Cleggan Bay Disaster’ which tells the tale of a 1927 October Storm that devastated two Connemara Communities; with ‘The Ballad of John B. Whistlin’’ they allow an Americana edge to creep into the mix and there’s also classic seafaring song with ‘Sally Brown’.

For all fans of Irish folk ‘The Cleggan Bay Disaster’ is definitely one for the collection.

Undergoing a few changes in their years together, Fleadh are currently Saoirse Mhór (vocals, guitar, percussion, songwriting) Tommy Gorny (guitar, bass, backing vocals) Marcus Eichenlaub (fiddle) Frank Dürschner (banjo, mandolin, harmonica, backing vocals) and Frank Weber (uilleann pipes, low whistle, bodhrán). On the ‘The Cleggan Bay Disaster’ they’re aided by guest musicians: Uli Schmidt (banjo) and Isabel Eichenlaub (cello).

Reviewer: Tim Carroll
Quelle: http://www.folkwords.com/latestreviews_85490.html, am 10.4.2013



Fleadh
Album: The Cleggan Bay Disaster
Label: Copperplate
Tracks: 13
Website: http://www.fleadh.de

Folk rock is a fairly standard genre over here on the British Isles now, but it really has spread all over the world. What immediately stuck me with this band was curiosity, as I wondered how a German folk band would consider itself as an Irish Folk band.

The answer in the end was: Very easily. Fleadh is a very well refined folk band using a fantastic merge of banjo, guitar, mandolin, fiddle and booming vocals. Their latest album release 'The Cleggan Bay Diaster' simply does not disappoint.

We get a real feel for Irish music through this album as classic sounding sets such as 'Castle Kelly/Sligo Creek' and 'Tongadale/New Rigged Ship' give us a bouncing reels but with a unique pattern that makes them distinctly recognisable.

The entire album gives us a great taste of the traditional but added spices to really keep you keen for the next set to come on. 'The Cleggan Bay Disaster' to me seems like a manifestation of well known pub sessions, giving that magic feel and atmosphere that you experience when musicians all play in sync.

Just as an extra bonus, the album is not limited to that kind of session music either, generally the vocal songs give us beautifully sounding tracks which is where we really get a feel for the distinctiveness of Fleadh. 'Hill of Plenty' gives us a very strong harmony during the curious of multiple vocals and helps you to feel for the story being told.

Overall an undeniably brilliant album which should be a standard for any folk collection.

reviewer: Paul Rawcliffe
Fatea Magazine, http://www.fatea-magazine.co.uk/, 03/2013



(Celtic Rock - Celtic Rock & Punk Fanzine) am 4. März 2013:

Fleadh ~ The Cleggan Bay Disaster (2013)

Seit dem vorigen Album Humpy’n Lumpysind knapp drei Jahre vergangen. Trotzdem ist bei Fleadh eine klare Weiterentwicklung hin zu einem schärferen eigenen Profil zu verzeichnen. Dem neuen Album hat Frontmann Saoirse Mhor deutlich seinen Stempel aufgedrückt. Neben dem Titelstück singt er noch vier weitere eigene Songs. Sein letztes Soloalbum als Singer/Songwriter hatten wir ebenfalls vorgestellt. Auf Gastmusiker wurde bis auf zwei Ausnahmen (Banjo, Cello) verzichtet.

Nach eigener Aussage wollen Fleadh „ehrlichen Irish Folk“ spielen. Dem entspricht die Instrumentierung mit Fiddle, Pipes, Mandoline, Banjo und anderem mehr. Das Quintett räumt aber der harmonischen und rhythmischen Begleitung mit akustischen Gitarren, Bass und Percussion einen sehr viel größeren Raum ein als branchenüblich und integriert andere Stile. Die kommen großenteils aus Amerika: Swing, etwas Bluegrass, Blues und alles was groovt. Die irischen Melodien werden nicht nur begleitet, sondern mit einem durchdachten musikalischen Gegenpart versehen. Dabei ragen besonders die ausgefeilten Gitarrenstimmen heraus, die oft Intros oder Zwischenspiele mit eigenen Melodielinien oder Gegenrhythmen gestalten, was über pure Begleitung weit hinausgeht. Die unterlegten Akkorde und Basslinien weichen oft vom Gewohnten oder in der Melodie Angelegten ab. Dies trifft allerdings nicht unbedingt die Hörgewohnheiten und wirkt mitunter verkopft, was mir speziell beim letzten Reelset auffiel. Eine Menge Groove und Swing sind also da, speziell bei Van Morrisons Moondance. Was mir etwas fehlt, ist das Treibende, der Tanzcharakter, der Druck, der bei den Jigs und Reels gemeinhin mit kraftvollem Unisonospiel der Melodieinstrumente erzielt wird, die hier öfter solo oder im Duo agieren. Dies ändert aber nichts an dem hohen spieltechnischen Niveau, dem mit einem guten Soundmix Genüge getan wird.

Saoirse Mhor singt zurückhaltend, aber eindringlich, und wird mit wirkungsvollen backing vocals unterstützt. Eastbound Train von Luka Bloom ein ist ideales, schwungvolles Eröffnungsstück. Die selbst geschriebenen Songs haben einen recht unterschiedlichen Charakter und meist starke, gut singbare Refrains. In Cleggan Bay Disaster wird vom Untergang eines Fischboots vor der Küste von Connemara im Jahr 1927 erzählt. Trotz des traurigen Themas eine eingängige, swingende Nummer. Das Stück hatte mir live in Balve 2011 besonders gut gefallen und wird in unseren Charts zu hören sein. Fast noch besser das bildstarke Hill of Plenty, ein Blick auf die irische Finanzkrise, sowie Row Home, das eine poetische Szenerie entwirft. Musikalisch wunderbar warm; eine mögliche Konkurrenz für Ride On. Im Curragh Song, einer heiteren Erinnerung an Kinderzeiten, klingt Saoirse Mhor mit dickem Kildare-Akzent fast mehr wie Christy Moore als dieser selbst. Beide stammen aus der gleichen Gegend, der Curragh. Dort in Newbridge fand am 1. Februar übrigens das offizielle CD-Release statt.

Trotz eines geschlossenen Gesamteindrucks gibt es also eigenwillige Akzente. Dazu passen gut die gemalten Bilder, die Booklet und Label zieren. Die dreizehn Titel erschließen sich nicht beim ersten Hören, lohnen aber die intensivere Beschäftigung. Die eigenen Texte sind im Booklet abgedruckt und stehen auch auf der Hompage.











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